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Introduction - Neonatal androgenization was associated with the ingestion of a product during pregnancy, which was labeled as containing Siberian ginseng (1). The image on the product was of an actual ginseng plant (Panax spp.) not Eleutherococcus senticosus (formerly sometimes referred to as Siberian ginseng) and analysis of the product indicated that neither eleuthero nor ginseng compounds were present, but that Chinese silk vine (Periploca sepium) was (2).

Methods of Analysis

Quality control of roots of Eleutherococcus senticosus by HPLC

Identification method of Eleuthero senticosus by HPTLC

References:

1. Koren G et al. Maternal ginseng use associated with neonatal androgenization. Journal of the American Medical Association, 1990, 264:1866.

2. Awang DV. Maternal use of ginseng and neonatal androgenization. Journal of the American Medical Association, 1991, 264:2865.

Additional Information

Awang D. Siberian ginseng toxicity may be case of mistaken identity. CMAJ. 1996 Nov 1;155(9):1237.

Waller DP et al. Lack of androgenicity of Siberian ginseng. Journal of the American Medical Association, 1991, 265:1826.

 




 


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